Today, the TTC is celebrating its 100th anniversary . The Toronto Transportation Commission (TTC) officially assumed responsibility for municipal transit services in the City of Toronto on September 1, 1921. This began an era of consolidation and expansion that accompanied and accelerated the astonishing growth of Toronto as a city. In 1954, the TTC adopted its present name - the Toronto Transit Commission - and opened the first subway line (Line 1 - Union to Eglinton stations). The TTC has played an important role in Toronto’s past and as we look ahead, it’s exciting to think about how we’ll continue to shape our city’s future.

You can help celebrate this historic milestone by:

  • Watching the TTC 100th anniversary video  
  • Picking up a 100th anniversary commemorative paper transfer on any TTC bus
  • Visiting Union Station to see the TTC’s 100th anniversary pageantry banners in front of the station. They’ll be on display until October 1, 2021.
  • Purchasing a TTC 100th anniversary commemorative coffee table book at ttcshop.ca.   (will be available mid-September)
  • Stopping by Nathan Phillips Square or the CN Tower to see them lit red, from dusk to dawn on September 1, 2021. 
  • Visiting the TTC’s 100th anniversary microsite  
  • Travelling to one of 12 subway stations to see the unique TTC: 100 Years of Moving Toronto photo exhibits.
  • Visiting the TTC: 100 Years of Moving Toronto virtual photography exhibit on the City of Toronto Archives website.
  • Checking out the TTC 100th anniversary street banners along Yonge Street between Lakeshore Blvd to Roehampton Avenue and along University Avenue / Queen’s Park between Front and Bloor streets, until the end of September.
  • Listening for celebration wishes by Toronto personalities in TTC subway stations.

TTC celebrating 100 years of moving Toronto

Today the TTC is celebrating its 100th anniversary. To honour this historic milestone, we’ve partnered with the City of Toronto Archives to promote our anniversary and celebrate 100 years of moving Toronto.

Travel back in time and see the evolution of the TTC by visiting 12 unique photography exhibits, titled TTC: 100 Years of Moving Toronto, at the following subway stations:

Station Exhibit Location
Don Mills Station Sheppard Subway Construction Concourse level
Kennedy Station Scarborough Rapid Transit Concourse level
Main Street Station Streetcar Advertising Cards Concourse level
Bay Station Station Concepts by Artist Sigmund Serafin Cumberland Terrace hallway outside fare line
Kipling Station Women Guides on the TTC Concourse level between West Passenger Pick-up Drop Off and collector booth
Finch Station Moved by Electricity Concourse level, transfer between TTC bus terminal and subway
Queen Station Streetcar Trackage Construction in the 1920’s Passageway connection between Northbound and Southbound platforms
Union Station Harbourfront and Spadina Light Rail Transit Streetcar entrance
Dupont Station Yonge Subway Construction by Artist John DeRinzy Subway platforms
Spadina Station Transit System Maps Concourse connection between Line 1 and Line 2
St Clair West Station Transit Expansion Means Development Concourse level
Vaughan Metropolitan Station Buses and Streetcars in the 1920’s Concourse level

The City of Toronto Archives is celebrating TTC’s rich history virtually through its TTC: 100 Years of Moving Toronto photography exhibit on the City of Toronto Archives website. The exhibit will showcase a wealth of newly digitized images of female employees at the TTC during the Second World War, accessible vehicles since the 1940s, and construction shots of Line 1 and Line 4. Also highlighted are 21st century innovations such as low-floor streetcars, electric buses and green roofs at TTC facilities. It’s a larger glimpse into TTC’s history that expands on the exhibits in the select subway stations.

The exhibit showcases a wealth of newly digitized images of female employees at the TTC during the Second World War, accessible vehicles since the 1940s, and construction shots of Line 1 and Line 4. Also highlighted are 21st century innovations such as low-floor streetcars, electric buses and green roofs at TTC facilities. It’s a larger glimpse into TTC’s history that expands on the exhibits in the select subway stations.

The exhibits will be available for viewing until July 2022.